Run to Feed the Hungry returns to Sacramento and raises more than $ 900,000

More than 27,000 people gathered in East Sacramento Thursday morning for the Run to Feed the Hungry event, which organizers say is the largest Thanksgiving Day fun run in the country. Run to Feed the Hungry, which has become a tradition for Thanksgiving Day in Sacramento, returned to a personal event this year after the pandemic forced a completely virtual event in 2020. People can still participate virtually as well. The event – which can be either a 5K or 10K run or walk – is the biggest fundraiser for Sacramento Food Bank and Family Services. About one-third of participants do 10K and two-thirds do 5K. This year’s event has raised more than $ 900,000, organizers said. “I feel so blessed that people held on to us during the pandemic,” Blake Young, president of Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services, said shortly after 10,000 runners took off after 6 p.m. 8.15. “Just to see all these people out here is absolutely amazing.” Are you participating this year? Share a picture and tell us why you attended the event. Over the past year, the food bank has gone from distributing food to an average of 150,000 people each month to an average of 250,000 people. It expects to provide 33 million meals by 2021. Run to Feed the Hungry is its biggest fundraiser. For 2021, the organizers recommended that participants be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or tested before the event. There were also rolling starts to keep things less crowded at the starting line. Masks and rubbing alcohol were also available at the event. The event started on J Street west of the entrance to Sacramento State and ran a loop through the East Sacramento neighborhood. “This is the first time I do it and it was a great race,” said one participant, Tracy, near the finish line. “I’m thankful for life. I’m thankful to wake up in the morning with a breath. I’m thankful to God. I’m thankful for food.” Many people wore turkey hats while some wore full turkey costumes. A woman in an inflatable turkey get-up could be seen waddling down the road. A couple of people in full body gingerbread costumes also showed up. There were also lots of babies in the crowd. One participant, Jim, had participated in the first Run to Feed the Hungry race back in 1994, when only 796 people participated. “The weather was good. The route was a little different,” he recalled of that event. Jim said this year’s turnout was “incredible, and what’s even more incredible is the good that comes from it. The money that goes to feed the hungry. That’s the more important thing.” Run to Feed the Hungry is dependent on hundreds of volunteers to complete the event. One of them, Daniel, was seen dancing on the sidelines of the race on Thursday. Daniel told KCRA 3 that he has volunteered for Running to feed the hungry for about a decade. He said he has a lot to be thankful for this year. He got married and moved into a new house. Daniel also talked about how the pandemic has affected his life. “We got people to die very early from COVID,” he said. “I had six friends who died within the first three months. It was like this huge impact on us. We just hid out because we did not want to get worse.” This Thanksgiving, it’s just “huge to be out ,” he said. See your photos from Run to Feed the Hungry below (App users, click here to see photos from the race).

More than 27,000 people gathered in East Sacramento Thursday morning for the Run to Feed the Hungry event, which organizers say is the largest Thanksgiving Day fun run in the country.

Run to Feed the Hungry, which has become a tradition for Thanksgiving Day in Sacramento, returned to a personal event this year after the pandemic forced a completely virtual event in 2020. People can still participate virtually as well.

The event – which can be either a 5K or 10K run or walk – is the biggest fundraiser for Sacramento Food Bank and Family Services. About one-third of participants do 10K and two-thirds do 5K. This year’s event has raised more than $ 900,000, organizers said.

“I feel so blessed that people held on to us during the pandemic,” Blake Young, president of Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services, said shortly after 10,000 runners took off after 6 p.m. 8.15. “Just to see all these people out here is absolutely amazing.”

Over the past year, the food bank has gone from distributing food to an average of 150,000 people each month to an average of 250,000 people. It expects to provide 33 million meals by 2021. Run to Feed the Hungry is its biggest fundraiser.

For 2021, the organizers recommended that participants be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or tested before the event. There were also rolling starts to keep things less crowded at the starting line. Masks and rubbing alcohol were also available at the event.

The event started on J Street west of the entrance to Sacramento State and ran a loop through the East Sacramento neighborhood.

“It’s the first time I do it and it was a great race,” said one participant, Tracy, near the finish line. “I’m thankful for life. I’m grateful to wake up in the morning with breathing. I’m thankful for God. I’m grateful for the food.”

Many people wore turkey hats while some wore full turkey costumes. A woman in an inflatable turkey could be seen waddling down the road. A couple of people in full body gingerbread costumes also showed up. There were also lots of babies in the crowd.

Woman in turkey costume

One participant, Jim, had participated in the first Run to Feed the Hungry race back in 1994, when only 796 people participated.

“The weather was nice. The route was a little different,” he recalled of that event.

Jim said this year’s turnout was “incredible, and what’s even more incredible is the good that comes from it. The money that goes into feeding the hungry. That’s the most important thing.”

Run to Feed the Hungry relies on hundreds of volunteers to complete the event. One of them, Daniel, was seen dancing on the sidelines of the race on Thursday.

Daniel told KCRA 3 that he has volunteered for Run to Feed the Hungry for about a decade. He said he has a lot to be thankful for this year. He got married and moved into a new house.

Daniel also talked about how the pandemic has affected his life.

“We made people die very early from COVID,” he said. “I had six friends who died within the first three months. It was like this huge impact on us. We hid just because we didn’t want to get worse.”

This Thanksgiving, it’s just “great to be out,” he said.

See your photos from Run to Feed the Hungry below

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(App users, click here to see photos from the race.)

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